Free shipping and processing on all orders over $350!
Welcome!
Cover: Voodoo in New Orleans

This title is part of:

Voodoo in New Orleans

Format List S/L Price Qty
$28.50 $19.95

Click here for more information on Bearport eBooks.

$42.79 $29.95

Save an additional 25% off the eBooks!

$49.93 $34.95

Marie Laveau was known as the Voodoo Queen of New Orleans. In the mid-1800s, many people in New Orleans believed that voodoo practitioners could contact the spirits of the dead to ask for their help. Marie Laveau was said to use magical charms and potions to place or remove curses on those she wished to help--or harm! Did this voodoo priestess really have the power to contact the spirit world and cast spells? An exciting narrative format brings a fascinating period of American history to life, with plenty of creepy details to satisfy young horror fans. Chilling photos and illustrations and clear, age-appropriate text will keep readers turning the pages to discover the secrets of the voodoo queen.

 
Interest Level Grade 4 - Grade 9
Reading Level Grade 4
BISACS JNF025000
Genre Narrative Nonfiction, Nonfiction
Copyright 2011
Publisher Bearport Publishing
Series HorrorScapes
Language English
Number of Pages 32
Dimensions 8 x 10
ISBN 9781936087990, 9781936088775, 9781617720956
Title Format Reinforced book, Hosted eBook, Savings Bundle
Dewey 299.6'750976335
ATOS Reading Level 5.1
Lexile Reading Level 900
Scholastic Reading Counts Level 6.2
AR Quiz Number 139268
Author Stephen Person
 

Voodoo in New Orleans

The HorrorScapes series takes on such well-trod topics as Dracula, King Tut, and Salem witchcraft, but it’s especially nice to see this eye-opening take on a subject often avoided. Using clear paragraphs ideal for the reluctant reader, Person supplies background on ceremonies, gris-gris, and the religion’s geographic origins (Benin, Africa) as well as setting a historical context for New Orleans. However, the bulk of the text involves Marie Laveau, the voodoo queen who rose to prominence around 1820 and whose story has enough dark facets to flesh out an entire biography. Laveau was a powerful voodoo priestess—allegedly, she held three guinea peppers in her mouth for hours before placing them under a judge’s chair to sway a verdict—but also a practicing Catholic who nursed injured soldiers and victims of yellow fever. Info boxes on every page supply further jolts, including the unsettling rumor that Laveau’s tomb is encircled each night by a giant snake. Purple predominates a gritty design heavy on modern-day photos of a city still obsessed with this mysterious practice.

Voodoo in New Orleans

The HorrorScapes series takes on such well-trod topics as Dracula, King Tut, and Salem witchcraft, but it’s especially nice to see this eye-opening take on a subject often avoided. Using clear paragraphs ideal for the reluctant reader, Person supplies background on ceremonies, gris-gris, and the religion’s geographic origins (Benin, Africa) as well as setting a historical context for New Orleans. However, the bulk of the text involves Marie Laveau, the voodoo queen who rose to prominence around 1820 and whose story has enough dark facets to flesh out an entire biography. Laveau was a powerful voodoo priestess—allegedly, she held three guinea peppers in her mouth for hours before placing them under a judge’s chair to sway a verdict—but also a practicing Catholic who nursed injured soldiers and victims of yellow fever. Info boxes on every page supply further jolts, including the unsettling rumor that Laveau’s tomb is encircled each night by a giant snake. Purple predominates a gritty design heavy on modern-day photos of a city still obsessed with this mysterious practice.

Author/Illustrator biography
Detailed maps
Glossary of key words
Index
Table of contents
Full-color photographs, Full-color illustrations